Deadlines!!!

Yikes! Things are suddenly piling up. Do we get ourselves into tight (scheduling) spots (by over committing) or does our fast pace, speeding by world impose them on us? Or . . . am I just slowing down?

Vacation is officially OVER!

American Heritage Dictionary

dead•line  (dĕd’līn’)
n.

  1. A time limit, as for payment of a debt or completion of an assignment.
  2. A boundary line in a prison that prisoners can cross only at the risk of being shot.

tr.v., -lined, -lin·ing, -lines.

Origin: 1864

It began as a real line, drawn in the dirt or marked by a fence or rail, restricting prisoners in Civil War camps. They were warned, “If you cross this line, you’re dead.” To make dead sure this important boundary was not overlooked, guards and prisoners soon were calling it by its own bluntly descriptive name, the dead line. An 1864 congressional report explains the usage in one camp: “A railing around the inside of the stockade, and about twenty feet from it, constitutes the ‘dead line,’ beyond which the prisoners are not allowed to pass.” Nothing could be more emphatic than dead line to designate a limit, so we Americans happily applied the term to other situations with strict boundaries. For example, the storyteller O. Henry wrote in 1909 about crossing “the dead line of good behavior.” But it was the newspaper business that made deadline more than just a historical curiosity. To have the latest news and still get a newspaper printed and distributed on time requires strict time limits for those who write it. Yet many are the excuses for writers to go beyond their allotted time: writers’ block, writers’ perfectionism, or just plain procrastination. (Perhaps the writer is a deadbeat (1863)–another dead word invented by Americans during the Civil War.) Seeking the strongest possible language to counter these temptations, editors set deadlines, with the implication that “Your story is dead–You are dead–if you go beyond this time to finish it.”

Our urgent twentieth century has made such deadlines essential not just for reporters and other writers but in every kind of activity; there are deadlines for finishing a job or assignment, for entering a contest, for ransoming hostages, or for buying a product at the special sale price.

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3 thoughts on “Deadlines!!!

  1. Thanks for this morning’s History lesson! Even my Civil War buff husband didn’t know where it came from! Hope you get everything done before the “deadline”!
    Have a GREAT weekend!

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